User account

Discourse

Enjoy!
Enjoy!

Michael Heitz

Wong Ping’s "Who’s the Daddy"

“Sex,” writes the American philosopher, feminist, and film theorist Joan Copjec, “is the structural failure of language itself.” “Sex,” says Wong Ping, “is the language, not the message of my work.” The longer you spend with Wong Ping’s five-minute, garishly colored clips in 1980s aesthetic (more than a dozen of them in the meantime), and the installations that have emerged from them, the more it becomes clear that they are about more than humorous figures, as Wong—who was born in 1984...
OPEN
ACCESS
DE
  • China
  • motherhood
  • sexuality
  • contemporary art

 

Current Texts

Stephen Barber

An immodest proposal

J.G. Ballard’s self-declared ‘Immodest Proposal’ for a global war-­alliance to exact the destruction of America demonstrates the provocatory zeal of his last fiction plans, as well as their enduring prescience. As Ballard emphasises several times in the World Versus America notebooks, he is utterly serious in his concerns and visions.
Although the Ballard ­estate declined permission for any images of pages from the World Versus America archival notebooks to accompany this essay, any member of the general public interested to do so can readily visit the British Library and view the notebooks in their entirety in the freely-­accessible manuscripts collection there.

OPEN
ACCESS
DE

 

Political Reflections on Choreography, Dance and Protest

Political Reflections on Choreography, Dance and Protest


Oliver Marchart

Dancing Politics

The human body is the most important medium through which a public space is curved out of the social. Of course, this does not always have to occur in form of a militarized collective marching in-sync through the streets. Very often it is precisely the vulnerability of bodies which is used as a ­performative medium of protest (up to the extreme point where people decide to publicly set themselves on fire). Taking this word of caution into account, we may...
OPEN
ACCESS
  • Occupy Wall Street
  • acting
  • Hannah Arendt
  • activism
  • Jean-Luc Nancy
Current Texts
Blood!

Ines Kleesattel

Blood!

OPEN
ACCESS
DE
  • painting
  • subjectification
  • feminism
  • gender
  • gaze
  • body
  • art history
Current Texts

Andreas L. Hofbauer

The yoke of being, noteworthy dis-position

It wasn’t nature and its dangers that forced domestication and enabled the economic shrine. Temple and funerary cult, sacrifice and distribution of the meat—for Homer all sacrificial animals were still hieria, holy creatures—and the containment of wildness led to symbolic and socio-cultural change, which became the vector and motor of sedentary, food-producing communities. It wasn’t sheep, goats, or cattle that were domesticated first; it was the zoon logon echon itself that bowed to the self-created yoke of the cult. Why, we don’t know. Beyond this it’s important that unlike plants only very few species of animal can be domesticated, and that this shouldn’t be confused with taming. Economic significance develops as an epiphenomenon. It transforms from possible human sacrifice to animal sacrifice to the distribution of meat in early “Greek” antiquity, then to the obeloi (skewers with varying amounts of meat, as tokens for the priests’ or judges’ portion; even...

OPEN
ACCESS
DE
  • anthropology
  • economization
  • money
  • ethnology