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Lawless: Clouds Reprise
Lawless: Clouds Reprise

Ute Holl

The Moses Complex

The Moses complex derives its actuality from recalling the emergence of cultures as fields of mutually engendering relationships. From the perspective of media studies, which is a science of differential relationships between materialities and immaterialities, noises and messages, channels and signals, apparatuses and perceptions, the relationship to God or gods turns out to be one between people and their systems of thought. So media studies argues against fundamentalism, whether ontological, anthropological, or technicistic. The figure of Moses is a decisive node...
  • exile
  • Jean-Marie Straub
  • community
  • Arnold Schönberg
  • Danièle Huillet

 

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Current Texts

Stephen Frosh

We are always part of an and and a between.

As it happens, in relation to questions of fragile identities, I think these are very useful words. One issue that has been confronted in recent discussions of identity has been whether it is singular or plural and if the latter, which is the predominant critical view, what kind of plurality is being evoked by the term? Specifically, are we talking about something that is fragmented or something that is multiple? Is the human subject notionally one, but through exposure to forces of various kinds, ranging from the excessive competing demands of post-modernity through to devastating trauma, it becomes a split subject? Or does the multiplicity of selves and identities (to run the terms together for a moment) reflect the simple reality of life – we are multiple beings, and our task is to do something with this multiplicity, not to wish it gone? It is this position that I would...

  • Hannah Arendt
  • identity
  • family
  • Judith Butler
  • Judaism
Current Texts

Frank Ruda

Democracy and its Discontents

Fredric Jameson has diagnosed the contemporary situation as one of subjective perplexity and disorientation. After the failures of all the Marxist attempts to install a framework which could provide for a collective subjective orientation, and after the perpetual intensification of late capitalism’s dynamics, the contemporary epoch is marked by the feeling that “the truth of … experience no longer coincides with the place in which it takes place.” This is to say, that individuals become disoriented because they lack an effective cognitive map of the complete situation they are in. This lack of orientation originates in the absence of a standpoint that would provide not only an abstract, but also a concretizable, perspective on the totality of the situation in which an individual finds himself. Badiou has further complicated the problem of disorientation, by linking it to the modalities of subjectivization offered by contemporary societies. In his analysis he refers to...

  • aesthetics
  • art criticism
  • poetry
  • art
  • contemporary art

 

Around a sculpture by Alberto Giacometti
Around a sculpture by Alberto Giacometti

Georges Didi-Huberman, Mira Fliescher (ed.), ...

The Cube and the Face

The Cube, as we can see, isn’t one. It is an ­irregular polyhedron which catalogues describe as having twelve sides — that nice figure, twelve, a destinal figure if ever there was one, which willfully evokes Mallarmé’s throw of the dice, at the very moment that the clock strikes twelve at midnight, in the dark house of Igitur. One can imagine that Giacometti wanted to give a unique volume to the twelve facets — six and six — of two cubes added together: a unique architecture...
  • art history
  • art theory
  • abstract art
  • Alberto Giacometti
  • face
Current Texts

Ulaş Aktaş

The development of cultural screens

The radicalisation of the process of civilisation is a challenge to art, even an overwhelming one. High-modernist art, with its claims to understanding and expressing the world, positioned within a world that has become highly complex, is challenged by itself.

How is one to dance against Auschwitz or Hiroshima?

The sheer attempt to “dance against” anything would be naïve! Art after modernism – and I think the date 1945 would serve very well as a point of reference – had to and must now relinquish its own irresolvable complexity and retreat. It becomes in a sense truly radical but it would be more accurate to say it becomes nuclear, focussing on the core. Beckett’s plays are destilled cores – their greatness lies in their smallness. Absolute music, absolute art – Merce Cunningham’s dance could well be termed absolute dance in this sense – cristallises something from out of the cultural forms of bourgeois art, something which can...

  • immunization
  • crisis
  • body
  • dancing
  • politics
Current Texts

Florian Cramer

Digital ‘Multitudes’?

The ‘cyber’-culture of the 1980s and 1990s was more than just a pop phenomenon: though, on the one hand, it was a product of science fiction novels like William Gibson’s Neuromancer (1984), films like The Matrix (1999) and early electronic social media like The Well, it was also theorized academically within cultural studies, media studies and the social sciences of the time. In cyberfeminist texts such as Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto (1983), Sadie Plant’s Zeros and Ones: Digital Women and the New Technoculture (1997) and N. Katherine Hayles’s How We Became Posthuman (1999), the hybridization of the ‘real’ and the ‘virtual,’ of bodies and machines, became a central concern. Against the backdrop of cyberculture and gender studies, cyberfeminism, declared by the Australian artist collective VNS Matrix in a 1991 manifesto, viewed the technical and cultural disruption of digital information technology as a way to undermine traditional gender relations. In the...

  • cyberculture
  • internet
  • identity
  • Anonymous
  • digital culture