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Friedrich Balke: Endless Expropriations of the Body
Endless Expropriations of the Body
(p. 139 – 153)

Friedrich Balke

Endless Expropriations of the Body
On the Relation between Politics and Potentialities in the Story of Lucretia

PDF, 15 pages

  • change
  • ethics
  • potentiality
  • emancipation / liberation
  • justice
  • politics

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Friedrich Balke

Friedrich Balke

is Professor of History and Theory of Artificial Worlds at the Bauhaus-University Weimar and spokesperson of the DFG-Research Training Group Media of History – History of Media. His areas of teaching and research focus on the cultural history of political sovereignty, governmentality and modern biopolitics, interrelations of media and forms of knowledge, aesthetic theory and French philosophy.

Other texts by Friedrich Balke for DIAPHANES
Mark Potocnik (ed.), Frank Ruda (ed.), ...: Beyond Potentialities?

Nearly the whole history of political thought is spanned between two poles: one of founding, establishing, and justifying a stable and just order on one side and of justified transformation and necessary break with that same order on the other side. Between institution and emancipation, reform and revolution, the question of possibility is always arising for politics. Are there possibilities to change the order of society? Are there possibilities for a different justice? Where to find them and how to define them? Are they already present in the situation, or do they have to be actively created? Or does one have to rethink collective emancipation in a way that it does not rely upon given possibilities?

The question of possibility is raised in philosophy itself in different terms: as a question of potentiality and potentials but also as a question of the impossibilities of changing political order. In recent political discussions this question is more present than ever and is newly posed in fundamental ways by thinkers such as Agamben, Badiou, and Deleuze, or Lacan and Žižek. The present volume assembles articles that investigate this question and the new guise it took from different perspectives and highlight its relevance for contemporary political thought.