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Fares Chalabi: Intensive Listening: Unfolding the Notion of Justice Through Reading the Work of Lawrence Abu Hamdan
Intensive Listening: Unfolding the Notion of Justice Through Reading the Work of Lawrence Abu Hamdan
(p. 63 – 94)

Fares Chalabi

Intensive Listening: Unfolding the Notion of Justice Through Reading the Work of Lawrence Abu Hamdan

PDF, 32 pages

  • legal practice
  • society
  • law
  • criticism
  • justice

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Fares Chalabi

was born in Beirut in 1977. He obtained his BA in philosophy in 2002 from the Lebanese University, and a diploma in architecture at Université De Balamand-Académie Libanaise Des Beaux-Arts (ALBA) in 2004. He continued his studies in philosophy at Paris 8 where he obtained a Master 2 in 2008, and his PhD in 2016. Today Chalabi teaches philosophy at American University of Beirut (AUB), and art theory at ALBA and Université Saint-Joseph (USJ). His main fields of interest are the study of ontological argumentation, ethics and aesthetics—in line with the Deleuzian approach.
Liza Mattutat (ed.), Roberto Nigro (ed.), ...: What’s Legit?

Once considered a stepchild of social theory, legal criticism has received a great deal of attention in recent years, perpetuating what has always been an ambivalent relationship. On the one hand, law is praised for being a cultural achievement, on the other, it is criticised for being an instrument of state oppression. Legal criticism’s strategies to deal with this ambivalence differ greatly: while some theoreticians seek to transcend the institution of law altogether, others advocate a transformation of the form of law or try to employ counter-hegemonic strategies to change the content of law, deconstruct its basis or invent rights. By presenting a variety of heterogeneous approaches to legal criticism, this volume points out transitions and exhibits irreconcilable differences of these approaches. Without denying the diversity of different forms of critique, they are related to one another with the aim of broadening the debates which all too often are conducted only within the boundaries of the separate theoretical currents.