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Humanities

Art in a False Present
Art in a False Present

Anselm Franke (ed.), Tom Holert (ed.)

Neolithic Childhood

The impression that “Neolithic Childhood” is a monographic project, dedicated to a single personality from history, is deceptive. Einstein himself was deeply wary of the monograph genre. In the early 1930s, he wrote that it served the “normalization” of art, because it ensured that “a person and their work are too sharply separated and that both are removed from significative relations.” 1 He emphatically shifted those “significative relations”—the social, political, economic, religious, epistemological, anthropological, and psychological contexts that determine a...
  • 1930s
  • art history
  • avant-garde
  • ethnology
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Jean-Luc Nancy

Ζένοι και Zah και Zuh

Ξένος extraneus του έξω όχι του μέσα (intraneus) όχι της οικίας unheimlich όχι του heim όχι της εστίας της άλλης πλευράς της πόρτας – fores, foreigner όχι υπερβολικά στον ρυθμό, odd όχι κανονικός όχι συνήθης σπάνιος ιδιάζων seltsam παράξενος besherat γενναίος κομψός απρόβλεπτος στραβός verschroben

λοξός αναπάντεχος εξαιρετικός εκπληκτικός

 

Είναι εκπληκτικό πόσες λέξεις εκφράσεις τρόπους διαφορετικούς έχουμε για να μιλήσουμε για τον παράξενο ξένο τον ausländer τον έξω από τη χώρα και όχι «pays avec nous» όπως λέγαμε κάποτε στη Γαλλία «c’est un pays à moi» για να πούμε κάποιος από το χωριό μου τη γειτονιά μου την περιοχή μου την πατρίδα μου

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Marcus Quent

Belief in the world is what we most lack.

It was Gilles Deleuze who in various contexts underlined that what we most lacked was “belief in the world.” The odd remark appears, for example, in a conversation in 1990 with the Italian Marxist Antonio Negri about revolutionary emergence and the political force of minorities. In this dialogue Negri examines his interlocutor’s thought in the light of the “problem of the political,” which connects the various stages of the philosopher’s intellectual biography. Deleuze’s remark here is the reprise of a motif that would be familiar to readers of his second book on cinema, which appeared in 1985, in which Deleuze contends that the “power of modern cinema” is based on its ability to “give us back” our lost “belief in the world.”

At the end of the conversation Negri asks his dialogue partner about the possibility of present-day processes of subjectivization. After initially emphasizing the “rebellious spontaneity” of such processes, Deleuze...

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Humanity is a metahuman concept.

Rolf Bossart, Milo Rau

Humanity is a metahuman concept.

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  • art theory
  • transhumanism
  • postmodernism
  • re-enactment
  • realism
  • artistic practice

 

Media and Mathematics of Dynamic Networks
Media and Mathematics of Dynamic Networks

Tobias Harks (ed.), Sebastian Vehlken (ed.)

Neighborhood Technologies

Whether our contemporary society and culture may be characterized by a mere preoccupation with concepts of space or a predominant fixation on the dynamics of time – with the speculative power of world-wide financial markets and their respective financial tools (e.g., micro-trading) and the increasing penetration of scientific research by computational tools like computer simulations and their implications for a futurologic governmental style (e.g., in fields like climate research or pre-emption) as only two protruding pillars: The time-critical dynamics of...
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  • mathematics
  • algorithms
  • media technique
  • biology
  • modeling
Current Texts

Anna Tuschling

Media Worlds and Affect

The tendency toward the globalization of the affect code compiled thus far is manifested as much in image atlases and catalogs of affect as in universal grammar and the language of popular images, since this code is precisely intended to be valid irrespective of space and time and thus also attain global reach in the service of a better understanding of facial expressions. If we assume that the above mentioned facial expressions may be traced to innate basic emotions, this neither forecloses the possibility that feelings may be simulated, nor implies that all humans are equally capable of recognizing emotions. Ekman certainly takes into account the potential contained in optical media such as television, which he treats as a training ground for facial recognition and which, therefore, may present a methodological challenge to intercultural studies: “Perhaps everyone learned their ‘universal’ expressions from watching Sesame Street on television!”

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  • epistemology
  • affective computing
  • interface
  • affects
  • emotions
Current Texts

Richard Ingersoll

A door that is opened and closed at the same time

The recourse to irony may seem singularly inappropriate to the field of architecture if by architecture one ascribes Durand’s “the art of the necessary.” Building as structure, material, and social program would seem to be the most direct and irony-free cultural phenomenon: structure and materials have a legal responsibility to function properly; and shelter is a basic human imperative. In this sense there is incontrovertible quiddity in the weight, expense, and purpose of architecture. But if one asks, along with Nikolaus Pevsner, if utilitarian structures such as the bicycle shed qualify as architecture, one is forced to recognize that architecture belongs to a discourse that goes far beyond the phenomenal acts of shelter and construction because it is circumscribed by texts and subject to interpretation. With the recognition of the textuality of architecture, the question of irony, a quintessential result of interpretation, becomes a significant effect of architecture, if not...

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  • illusionism
  • Marcel Duchamp
  • irony
  • Frank Gehry
  • postmodernism